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(Course Summary)

Black Girl in Suburbia Screening and Conversation about Inclusive Teaching

Category: Teaching Engagement Department: Academic Affairs - Teaching Engagement Program
Description:

After a screening of her award-winning documentary Black Girl in Suburbia, Melissa Lowery joins a panel of UO undergraduate students to discuss what inclusive teaching means at predominantly white institutions—from K-12 schools to college classrooms. What classroom experiences have supported— or undermined—a sense of belonging and academic achievement for the students of color on our panel? How do faculty create conditions in which it is possible for students to learn from one another across differences and allow for shifts in students’ perspectives?  

This teaching conversation concludes a two-day symposium focused on Lowery’s 55-minute documentary film, which explores the experience of black women who grew up in predominantly white communities around Oregon. Join us for this special chance to discuss the racial dynamics that shape academic environments, a discussion that will center the voices and experiences of students of color in a conversation about teaching practice.

Learn more about the film here: http://www.blackgirlinsuburbia.com

Refreshments will be served

Hosted by the English Department & Writing Composition Program with support from the College of Arts and Sciences, Division of Undergraduate Studies, Teaching Engagement Program, Oregon Humanities Center, English Department Diversity Committee, Folklore Department, Cinema Studies, Ethnic Studies, Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence, Division of Equity and Inclusion, EMU Center for Student Involvement's The Be Series, and the Women of Color Faculty Group.

$ Session Dates Length Instructor Location Seats Free  
Apr 14, 2017 2 hrs TEP Staff McKenzie 129 140 open Registration
(Course Summary)

Completing a Quality Review of Your Online Course

Category: Teaching Engagement Department: Academic Affairs - Teaching Engagement Program
Description:

In this session, instructional designers from the UO Libraries Center for Media and Educational Technologies will go through the final review of an online course. You will be guided through an assessment program like Quality Matters or the Online Learning Community Quality Scorecard. This working session will be a hands-on. Be sure to bring your laptop, course syllabus and course objectives. (Laptops also will be available in the room.)

$ Session Dates Length Instructor Location Seats Free  
May 24, 2017 2 hrs CMET Staff Knight Library 41 40 open Registration
(Course Summary)

Dear X: Letters from the Classroom

Category: Teaching Engagement Department: Academic Affairs - Teaching Engagement Program
Description:

Reimagining undergraduate education through theater and dialogue

Join the Transforming Education by Design team as we perform some of the most moving responses from our archive of hundreds of student and faculty letters to each other. Hear what it feels like to teach and learn here. Help us challenge, refine, amplify the design principles that will shape a new UO core curriculum.

Location TBD. Refreshments served

$ Session Dates Length Instructor Location Seats Free  
Apr 18, 2017 2 hrs Lisa Freinkel TBD 68 open Registration
(Course Summary)

Empowering Language Learners: A Critical Pedagogy across the Curriculum

Category: Teaching Engagement Department: Academic Affairs - Teaching Engagement Program
Description:

How does working with materials in languages other than English enliven the possibilities of any course and introduce language learning in highly motivating and contextualized ways? Can proficiency in another language—say, by heritage speakers, international students, or those just fulfilling the language requirement—be a deeply empowering asset for students across the disciplines at UO?
 
In this interactive session, we’ll learn about the CAS Renaissance award winning-work of Robert Davis and Claudia Holguin (Romance Languages) and Julie Weise (History) to bring Spanish-language materials into courses in which the primary language of instruction is English—elevating the research-based aspect of these courses and drawing students into the powerful, human stories of their course subjects through an encounter with Spanish-language vernacular texts and their authors. They have successfully employed this critical language pedagogy with students with as little as one year of college Spanish, or who emerged from several years of high school Spanish erroneously believing, “I don’t remember anything.”
 
We’ll practice a real activity our presenters use in class, brainstorm ways this teaching could work in other contexts, and learn how CAS plans to support similar deconstructions of seeming divisions between “content” and “language” courses. Moreover, we’ll consider how a more multilingual relationship to instruction at UO energizes the core liberal arts mission of the university at a time when global citizenship is being undermined as a value in U.S. public discourse and student participation in language study in declining at American colleges and universities.
 
Our presenters want you to know that language “mastery" isn’t a prerequisite for embarking on this exciting teaching. If your research includes materials in languages other than English you are a good candidate for this workshop. 
 
Presenters:
Robert Davis, Professor of Spanish, director of language instruction in Romance Languages
Claudia Holguin, assistant professor of Spanish, Director of the Spanish Heritage Language Program
Julie Weise, associate professor of history

$ Session Dates Length Instructor Location Seats Free  
May 12, 2017 1 hr and 30 mins Robert Davis, Claudie Holguin, Julie Weise McKenzie 175 45 open Registration
(Course Summary)

Humanizing Your Online Course: Creating Learning Communities Online

Category: Teaching Engagement Department: Academic Affairs - Teaching Engagement Program
Description:

In this session we will explore the notions of "social presence" and "teaching presence" within an online course environment.   As with face-to-face classes, a strong sense of community in online environments boosts student motivation and encourages intellectual growth and risk taking. But how do we work with the physical distance to help students connect with one another and with us as instructors?  We will invite you to imagine ways to establish your own teaching presence to infuse your course with inviting, multi-sensory content; and consider different ways to build a learning community and maximize a sense of human connection. 

$ Session Dates Length Instructor Location Seats Free  
May 3, 2017 1 hr and 30 mins Robert Voelker-Morris PLC 72 23 open Registration
(Course Summary)

Introduction to Instructional Design: Mapping an Online Course

Category: Teaching Engagement Department: Academic Affairs - Teaching Engagement Program
Description:

The instructional design team the UO Libraries Center for Media and Educational Technologies introduce the basics of “modular” online course design. They will demonstrate how to use Canvas modules in a way that’s consistent with instructors’ goals for student learning. This includes how to develop content and activities and how to assess the learning that takes place in the modules. The session also will discuss making module architecture organized and consistent, allowing students to easily find assignments, presentations, activities, due dates, etc. Be sure to bring your laptops (and laptops will be available in the room) for this hands-on session. Also bring your course syllabus and objectives, if you have them.

 

$ Session Dates Length Instructor Location Seats Free  
May 10, 2017 2 hrs CMET Staff Knight Library 41 40 open Registration
(Course Summary)

Metacognition

Category: Teaching Engagement Department: Academic Affairs - Teaching Engagement Program
Description:

Metacognition, simply, is “thinking about one’s own thinking” (Cooper & Sandi-Urena 2009). Research shows that students who engage in metacognitive exercises perform better on exams, written assignments, and class discussions. Most importantly, thinking metacognitively is important for students to gain independence and agency as thinkers. How then can we foster students’ ability to be metacognitive and to reflect on how and why they learn? After participating in this workshop, you will be able to design activities and assignments that enhance students’ metacognitive skills and integrate these activities into your courses.

 

$ Session Dates Length Instructor Location Seats Free  
May 5, 2017 1 hr and 30 mins Shane Hall PLC 72 30 open Registration
(Course Summary)

Question Storming: The Role of Academic Residential Communities and the Future of the Residential University

Category: Teaching Engagement Department: Academic Affairs - Teaching Engagement Program
Description:

This workshop invites participants to explore the future of teaching and learning within the UO’s residential campus with a particular focus on the emerging Academic Residential Community (ARC) model.  Inspired by Warren Berger's book, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas, and the work of the Right Question Institute, this highly interactive and co-created session will question storm the most important ideas and questions—rather than brain storm the most plausible solutions and answers—for the challenges and opportunities of undergraduate education within a residential research university. We hope to unearth the most important questions that need to be asked as we look to UO's future in 5, 10, 20 years. 

 

The institution’s adoption of a mandatory live-on policy beginning in fall 2017 signals a recognition  of the academic benefits of a residential campus, and ARCs represent a signature student experience that align with President Michael Schill’s “Oregon Commitment to Student Access and Success.”  President Schill has identified the delivery “of a rich and diverse experience for students both inside and outside the classroom” as one of his three central objectives, and affirmed the institution’s commitment “to expanding our successful student engagement programs, like Academic Residential Communities and First-Year Interest Groups.”

 

ARCs remain a nascent idea the UO in contrast to many of our AAU comparators with longstanding and established living learning programs.  The UO ARC Council will soon enter its third year charged with thinking broadly about how to foster strategic interdisciplinary and cross-college partnerships to ensure ARCs engage students in pedagogically innovative and thematically articulated curricular pathways through general education requirements, pre-professional courses, and minor/major curriculum. In fall 2017 a constellation of 19 ARCs housed across eight residence halls will admit a projected 1100 incoming students encompassing partnerships with all eight academic colleges, over 20 majors, and several academic support units (e.g. CMAE, OAA, Dean of Students). Hence, this workshop occurs at a formative moment for this conversation.

Lunch will be served

 

Dr. Greg Merritt received his PhD at Michigan State University in the Higher Adult and Lifelong Program with a focus on teaching and learning. He spent almost 30 years as a practitioner in University Housing at both Michigan State and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor with an emphasis in the benefits of living/learning communities.  His first role at U of M, Ann Arbor was with the Center for Research on Teaching and Learning where he focused on improving faculty and graduate student instructor teaching.  

 

As the founding advisor of the First-Gen Students@Michigan student group at U of M, he also has seen the benefits of residential learning communities to enhance and improve outcomes with students with the least agency on our campuses.  

Sponsored by the Division of Undergraduate Studies and University Housing. 

$ Session Dates Length Instructor Location Seats Free  
Apr 26, 2017 1 hr and 30 mins Greg Merritt TBD 40 open Registration
(Course Summary)

Roundtable Discussion: Working with Supervising Faculty and Instructors of Record as a Graduate Student Teacher

Category: Teaching Engagement Department: Academic Affairs - Teaching Engagement Program
Description:

TEP invites graduate students who are working with supervising faculty to join a collaborative discussion about the complexities of teaching as part of a team. How does one work within the context and goals of the larger course and with a faculty mentor, at times inhabiting an intermediary role between student and professor? We’ll consider how this teaching can support graduate students’ own academic professionalization, how to establish mutual expectations, and how to access mentorship and support. By joining the discussion, you will hear from other UO graduate students who can share experiences and advice. TEP plans to use insights from this session to lead a similar conversation for faculty in Fall in the hopes of supporting positive, effective teaching teams.

 

$ Session Dates Length Instructor Location Seats Free  
Apr 5, 2017 1 hr and 30 mins Shane Hall PLC 72 30 open Registration
(Course Summary)

Strategies for Discussion Leaders

Category: Teaching Engagement Department: Academic Affairs - Teaching Engagement Program
Description:

Learn strategies for creating lively and fruitful conversations that help students build critical thinking skills, understand the fundamental questions of the course, and enjoy class time. We will identify the thinking and argumentation skills your students should be practicing, learn common questions and prompts that build these skills, review various discussion activities, and discuss strategies for addressing common problems that arise in class discussions.

$ Session Dates Length Instructor Location Seats Free  
Apr 11, 2017 2 hrs Jason Schreiner PLC 72 24 open Registration
(Course Summary)

Teaching and Professional Development for Career NTTF

Category: Teaching Engagement Department: Academic Affairs - Teaching Engagement Program
Description:

This workshop will feature a discussion about developing and maintaining a fulfilling and engaging career as NTTF instructional faculty at the University of Oregon. Join our distinguished panel of career NTTF instructors as they share what has fed their souls and helped them develop themselves as professionals. Facilitated by Lee Rumbarger, Teaching Engagement Program, Panelists include: Sierra Dawson (Human Physiology), Mike Urbancic (Economics), and others.

 

Hosted by United Academics and the Office of the Provost and Academic Affairs.

$ Session Dates Length Instructor Location Seats Free  
May 17, 2017 2 hrs Lee Rumbarger, Sierra Dawson, Mike Urbancic EMU 023, Lease Crutcher Lewis Room 50 open Registration
(Course Summary)

Writing a Statement of Teaching Philosophy

Category: Teaching Engagement Department: Academic Affairs - Teaching Engagement Program
Description:

A statement of teaching philosophy is a short narrative about your teaching that explains the principles and theories behind it. Teaching statements are often an essential element of job applications for academic positions and for promotion and tenure review. This workshop will review formats and best practices for writing a statement of teaching philosophy. You also will begin the writing process and leave with a draft outline of a teaching statement. Graduate students, newly hired faculty, and adjunct instructors who plan to apply for academic positions may particularly benefit from this workshop.

$ Session Dates Length Instructor Location Seats Free  
May 11, 2017 1 hr and 30 mins Jason Schreiner PLC 72 22 open Registration